A fascinating read from a new work by education reform leader, and Imagination Matters Imaginator, Sir Ken Robinson and author Lou Aronica. Their research recognises that traditional learning methods don’t work for all children, and that we can engage them in other ways rather than leave them out. The reminder that dance and the arts shouldn’t be reserved for the ‘gifted’ and affluent is always a worthy one.

Dance — and physical activity — should have the same status in schools as math, science and language. Psst: it may even help raise test scores, says Sir Ken Robinson.

For several years, I’ve been a patron of the London School of Contemporary Dance. In 2016, I was invited to give the annual lecture in honor of founding principal Robert Cohan, and I decided to talk about the role of dance in schools.

Before the lecture, I tweeted the title “Why Dance Is as Important as Math in Education.” I had a lot of positive responses and a number of incredulous ones. One tweet said, “Isn’t that going to be one of the shortest lectures ever?” Another said flatly, “Ken, dance is not as important as math.” One person tweeted, “So what? Telephones are more important than bananas. Ants are not as important as toilet ducks. Paper clips are more important than elbows.” (At least that was a creative response.) Some responses were more pertinent: “Is that so? Important for what and to whom? By the way I’m a math teacher.”

I’m not arguing against mathematics — it’s an indispensable part of the great creative adventure of the human mind. It’s also intimately involved with the dynamics of dance. Instead, this is an argument for equity in educating the whole child. I’m talking about the equal importance of dance with the other arts, languages, mathematics, sciences and the humanities in the general education of every child.

This article was  found on TED Ideas where you can read the full article. It is an excerpt from You, Your Child and School: Navigate Your Way to the Best Education, a new book by Sir Ken Robinson.

Posted by:Corrie Jones

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